Establishing Self-Discipline

Updated: 2 days ago

It is a fact, people who have self-discipline are happier. When people have self-discipline and self-control there is less debating, and the likelihood of making positive decisions increases significantly. People who make more level headed decisions also experience more satisfaction in their lives.


A lack of self-discipline can lead to problems with health, finances, procrastination, and overwhelm. The first step to establishing self-discipline is realizing that what you are doing is no longer working. When you start to take a close look at your life you will learn that you are likely causing yourself unnecessary pain. The secret to establishing self-discipline in your life starts with the desire to no longer contribute to your own suffering.


Motivations


Changing your life is undoubtedly overwhelming. It is important to start small, not biting off more than you can chew. It is as important to be adventurous and get outside of your comfort zone. This can feel overwhelming, but once on the other side you will feel a sense of accomplishment. Keep in mind that practice does not require perfection, and along your journey to establishing self-discipline, you deserve compassion.


These motivations can help you to change your mind about self-discipline.


You Might Inspire Someone Else


Leading by example is a great way to inspire others to take action. If you take time to improve procrastination habits, you can perhaps inspire someone else to find their way into meaningful work. If you build the self-discipline to improve your health, you may be able to encourage unhealthy friends or family to improve their health. Inspiring others can help you stay on course with your own self-discipline.


Do You Appreciate the Present Moment?


Life is a gift, and the present moment has many rewards, but you have to change your perception in order to stay motivated by the present moment. Life is filled with distractions and when you spend time caught up in distractions, life has a way of passing you by. Be present. Be grateful. Be purposeful.


Cultivating a Sense of Accomplishment


Huge projects can leave you feeling overwhelmed and get in the way of building self-discipline. Instead of taking on overwhelming projects, start taking small actions. There are always to-dos that require little to no effort and can leave you feeling accomplished, and of course, disciplined. Also it is important to know, taking a few minutes to work on lingering to-dos can leave you feeling a sense of accomplishment, and help with building self-discipline. Take just 5 or 10 minutes and start knocking out small tasks. Getting started is usually the hardest part.


Get Intimate with Discomfort


Self-discipline is challenged by uncomfortable, or challenging tasks or situations. Easy and comfortable are where many people live their lives, but easy and comfortable do not help to build character, self-esteem, or self-discipline.


Running from discomfort and indulging in distractions adds to life’s challenges and this behavior can in fact be life ruining. Start taking on discomfort in small, digestible doses. You will learn that discomfort is not as bad as you may think. The results will certainly act as the reward.


Give Yourself Compassion


The urge to quit will undoubtedly arrive. It will take practice, but it is important to remember you do not have to give into these urges. No matter your motivation or the task at hand, finding just ten committed minutes is not a huge undertaking. Become incredibly mindful of your habits and start to notice how often the urge to procrastinate, or avoid something comes up. Each time you feel avoidance surface, meet the urge with 10 minutes of productivity. You will soon realize, you do not have to give into old habits.


Do not be discouraged by messing up. You do not experience failure without having tried something, which makes failure, victory. Failing also presents the opportunity to learn something new, and invites accountability for past actions, and direction for future actions.


Building self-discipline is a journey and requires practice. Your starting point is now. Set a ten minute timer and get started.









© 2020 by Markesha Miller, Ph.D.